Recent Articles

Deputation to the House of Commons Special Committee on the Non-Medical Use of Drugs (February 19, 2002)

My name is Walter Cavalieri, and I am a founder of the Canadian Harm
Reduction Network, which is a nexus for individuals and organisations
dedicated to reducing the social, health and economic harms associated with
drugs and drug policies in Canada.

I am President of The Toronto Harm Reduction Task Force, an alliance of
individuals, community organizations and neighbourhood groups working
together to reduce the harms associated with the use and distribution of
drugs in Toronto.

Abusing The User: Police Misconduct, Harm Reduction and HIV/AIDS in Vancouver

A report by Human Rights Watch on the police operation to shut down the activity of drug dealers in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, BC, summer 2003

A review of the evidence-base for harm reduction approaches to drug use

A useful concise overview of harm reduction approaches to drug use

Taking Drug Laws Seriously - 2

In my January column, I presented my reasons for opposing the effort to combat the war on drugs by seeking to enact state referendums “legalizing medical marijuana.” The appeal of that approach to many libertarians is symptomatic of how wimpish some of them are about confronting statist medical, and especially psychiatric, principles and practices. Ted Galen Carpenter’s Bad Neighbor Policy: Washington’s Futile War on Drugs in Latin
America is a recent example.

Taking Drug Laws Seriously - 1

One of the referendums in the November 5, 2002 election “would have put thousands of drug offenders [in Ohio] into treatment programs instead of prison.” The amendment was supported by many libertarians and friends of libertarians. Propaganda for it was generously funded by billionaires Peter Lewis, George Soros, and John Sperling. Voters rejected it by a ratio of 67 to 33 percent. I have long argued that medicalizing the law in general, and laws prohibiting drugs in particular, is stupid and wicked. Probably for the wrong reasons, I believe voters in Ohio did the right thing.

Postcards from the Edge: Inclusion, Exclusion and Women Drug Users

Plenary presentation by
ANNIE MADDEN
at the 13th International Conference on the Reduction of Drug Related Harm,
in Ljubljana, Slovenia on 6 March 2002.

Presentation to the Canadian Senate's Special Committee on Illegal Drugs, Toronto, Canada (September 10, 2001)

First of all ...thank you for inviting me here and giving me the opportunity to speak with you. It is both a privilege and an opportunity, which I take very seriously.

I come here wearing a number of hats -

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